Our world is made up of false narratives.

What is a false narrative? It’s a story that either you or someone else has “brainwashed” into your head, that isn’t true. It’s false.

An an example could be, “Hey Joe, you need to keep that radio that Jan gave you forever, so Jan will know how much you love her.”

The new narrative could be:

”Hey Joe, tell Jan how much you’ve appreciated the radio and you’ve decided to let it go.”

——-

“Hey Susan, you have to keep sentimental items or else you will forget the person it reminds you of.”

The new narrative could be:

“Hey Susan, the chances of forgetting the person who gave you that item is low. Keep items you truly enjoy that remind you of the person, and let the rest go.”

——-

”Hey Josie, if you get rid of those clothes, it means you are wasteful and ungrateful.”

The new narrative could be:

“Hey Josue, getting rid of clothes you don’t love anymore is smart! You’ll have more space and appreciation for the fewer items you LOVE wearing.”

——-

“Hey Samantha, if you throw away those papers you are going to regret it.”

The new narrative could be:

“Hey Samantha, if you throw away those papers you are going to feel less scattered and more in control.”

——-

“Hey Lucy, if you get rid of Dad’s stuff, it means you don’t love him and he’ll come back from the grave and haunt you because you don’t appreciate him.”

The new narrative could be:

“Hey Lucy, you know you love Dad and don’t have to prove it to anyone by hanging onto his excess stuff. Keep a few favorite items and let’s pass the rest on. If he comes back from the grave to haunt you, we’ll sell tickets to the haunted house!”

“And maybe get a movie deal!!!”

——-

”Hey Drake, if you get rid of your ex-wife’s stuff, you’re going to get lonely.”

The new narrative could be:

“Hey Drake, if you get rid of some of your ex-wife’s stuff, you’ll begin to re-emerge with your own independent personality and style.”

——-

You can change false narratives about keeping stuff.  They are false stories when someone else has given you their thoughts, fears, or guilt about being in your situation. It could have been learned in your childhood, from your friends, or from all the online info you read – like this!

To turn the false narrative around, simply ask yourself if YOU want to get rid of something – and if there’s no fear, guilt, or shame associated with it, then it may be a truer narrative for YOU.

Another way to find out if you or some other influence is feeding you a false narrative is to ask yourself: If no one knew if I kept this stuff or not – and I mean No One, not even someone rolling around in their grave – what would I keep and what would I clean out?

If you’re dealing with a lot of stuff, then let go in phases. You’ll adjust to less items, and before you know it, you’ll probably notice that that amount of stuff seems like too much – and you’ll let go of more. It’s a process!

You know how you want your home to look and feel – remove items that aren’t making it feel that way.

It’s okay to let go of other people’s stuff… when you do, you re-emerge as the lighter, relaxed, happier person you really are. And that’s attractive because it’s the real you, not the weighed down false narrative person we become when buried under stuff.

Keep the stuff YOU love. Not everything!

(NOTE: If you or someone you know is going thru severe emotional pain due to a death, trauma, relationship separation, financial crisis, etc, then fear, anxiety, loneliness, grief, guilt, distress, etc can create confusion, which can lead to decision-making paralysis or decision-making impulsivity.  Don’t pressure yourself or others to let go during these times.)